#TenThingsNotToSayToAWriter

Yesterday,  was trending on Twitter. I have to admit, a lot of what was being said hit a little close to home. But what I realized was this:

One – non-writers don’t understand the career that is writing. To some degree, though, I think this can be said about almost every single profession. I’ve heard people refer to teachers as “glorified babysitters.” People think doing digital marketing (particularly social media) is easy if they’ve done it for themselves. And we’re all pretty familiar about how people tend to think there are cushy professions like modeling or acting. But what we can ALL learn from  is that while it may seem cushy or an easy job to an outsider, they just don’t understand the hard work that goes on behind the scenes.

Two – people, including avid readers, don’t understand the publishing industry. The amount of times I saw someone comment about getting books for free for family/friends, pirating books being “meh, whatever,” or when something is going to be published (if ever), etc. was astounding. I’ve been asked “when is your book going to be done?” or “when is it going to be published?” multiple times. On occasion, there is genuine curiosity. They know that they don’t know what happens, so they ask to get a better understanding. I can handle those questions. But the questions, or statements, like “when your book is published,” “when you become the next J.K. Rowling,” “when I see your book in theaters” etc. are irritating. They imply that if I don’t get published, if I don’t become the kind of major success story like Rowling, or if I don’t turn my manuscript sitting on my desk into a movie, that I will be a failure. It’s kind of a backwards way of trying to support a writer.

Three – (I’ll probably write an entire post on this…) Not one genre is “easier” to write than others, nor is one more difficult and therefore more prestigious. I have personally heard people talk down about certain genres and I know from what I saw on Twitter that I’m not alone. I’ll even broaden this out to journalistic writing or blogging or even writing posts for social media (which I have done, and let me tell you – writing light, whimsical posts for Facebook in the voice of a brand is EXHAUSTING) are just as noble of writing as say an epic fantasy novel. As someone who has dabbled in ALL of those writing styles, I can tell you that writing, no matter what it is, requires hard work.

 

That’s the end of my rant. If you have anymore thoughts, please, discuss in the comments!

Why You Should Have a Mobile-Friendly Website

Why You Should Have a Mobile-Friendly Website

Why You Should Have a Mobile-Friendly Website
You may have heard the phrase “Mobilegeddon” thrown around the past couple of months. If not, let me explain. Google recently updated their search algorithm, meaning that how your site gets ranked (aka how close to the top of the first page) has changed. But what has changed? Well, if you use Google search on your phone, Google now gives a boost in their rankings to mobile-friendly websites.

Cool, that’s awesome. Now when you go to sites, the first handful should ideally be mobile-friendly. But what if your site isn’t mobile-friendly? You might drop in your rankings. The solution: get a responsive website.

If your site isn’t responsive (or easy to use on mobile devices or tablets), then you are behind in the times. And I don’t mean to scare you, but mobile and tablet users are on the rise. If your site performs poorly on these types of screens, you may be loosing users.

Plus, as this article points out, responsive design is kind of implied at this point. No one says “Yes, can I please have a website that isn’t responsive?” You say “I want a website” and a good designer/developer should get you a site that is responsive.

But what about if you run/host your own site on something like WordPress? Have no fear! Getting your site responsive (and mobile/tablet-friendly) is pretty easy. Here are some quick options:

1. Find a responsive theme

Responsive themes are everywhere. If you are searching for a theme using the appearance>themes route, make sure you go to “feature filter” and check the “Responsive Layout” under the Layout column. This will ensure that your site will be responsive without any hassle. This is the route I chose.

2. Use a plugin

There are a variety of plugins you can use to make your site mobile-friendly without necessarily choosing a responsive theme. One of the most widely used plugin is JetPack Mobile Theme. You probably are already using JetPack for other things like stats and social sharing. But this is just one more added bonus. Here is a list of other options in case you want to shop around.

Granted, these options are for WordPress. I haven’t had experience building sites in Wix, SquareSpace or Weebly, but have linked some helpful posts from their sites for guidance.

Any questions about responsive design or websites? Let me know in the comments! I would be glad to help you make your site mobile-friendly!

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